sound designer, composer, director
Category:

Music theatre

MAYA – Documentary

Documentary film maker Felix Hentschel accompanied the production of the Mixed-Reality-Techno-Opera MAYA and held talks with the artists involved. The resulting film (ca. 40 min) illuminates the development of the Maya character and provides insights into the conception of the music and the design of the MAYA augmented reality app.

MAYA – Mixed-Reality-Techno-Opera

As the worlds first Augmented Reality opera, MAYA staged the former heating plant Munich-Aubing as a historic site. Through the AR-app on the own smartphone, the spectator betook himself in the perspective of a new civilization in the distant future, and looked back in amazement on the demise of our current civilization in the near future.

MAYA – Augmented Reality App

The standard theatre situation was reconfigured to an installation- and rave-like situation by means of the MAYA augmented reality App. Alive and present as an actor was only the mezzo-soprano Martina Koppelstetter. The digital world from which she originated was only visible through smartphones and AR. Experiencing this world through own smartphones, the audience strolled through the ruins and became the counterpart for MAYA with its presence, augmenting MAYA’s loneliness: MAYA had to sing against a mass of audience members gaping through their smartphones.

Lectures

Occasionally I am invited to give lectures about my work and sometimes I make videos of it. Here are a few examples: About MAYA, Artist Talk @ University of Glasgow, "Now listen to me!", Opera as political expression, the chant as utopia: Happy Happy!

KATHARINA

Worthless. Placeless. Katharina has lost everything: the lover, the job, the apartment. In her fight against oblivion she develops extreme, hateful energies. The bustle on Münchner Freiheit serves as a stage for a fictional character who is about to exceed the normative limits of social behavior once and for all.

VIOLA

The audience sits in the pharmacy and looks through the shop windows onto Pasing Station Square. Viola, an apparently sad and disoriented woman, appears on the scene. She seems to be in shock, having lost touch with time and space: "Is that inside or outside now? Is it still yesterday today?"

Happy Happy

There is no alternative. The public debate is under the seal of fatalism. There is no other objective than that of universal restrictions. Happy Happy brings together, in a sort of cabinet of wonders, impressions, quotations and scenes to become the plea for autonomy and co-humanity. The opera, written for a singer and a chorus, explores, in so doing, the connection between individual and crowd. It turns out that the person's singing gets lost in the hot-tempered aspiration of the multitude at the celebration. And life goes on. Happy Happy. (Commissioned by the National Opera Montpellier)

JETZT

'JETZT' (commissioned by the National Opera Montpellier) tries to tell the history of thought in a poetological way. Human being in relation to nature and his surrounding is in constant change. Man is re-inventing himself again and again by inventing new descriptions of himself and his surrounding. By those descriptions we can observe the changes in the past human history. It's the transformation of language use through human history which is the subject matter of this opera. Seven epochs are chosen. Short scenes about death interconnect those seven epochs.